Electric vehicle supply equipment

If you’re into electric vehicles, chances are you’ve read or heard the term “electric vehicle supply equipment”, also referred to as EVSE for short. To make it simple, electric vehicle supply equipment is basically the equipment designed to provide an EV with the power it needs to run. 

You may be more familiar with the term “electric vehicle charging stations” instead of “electric vehicle supply equipment”. Both concepts refer to the same type of device. Though, there are several types of EVSE: from residential to those found almost exclusively in public locations. They differ in certain features, which we shall now explore in further detail.

Electric vehicle charging stations’ characteristics

When considering driving an electric car, the first thing to understand is what type of charger to use with the vehicle you own. While searching for electric car charging stations, it is possible to find three different types of chargers that, at the same time, may have different plugs. 

Which charger should be used to recharge electric car batteries will also depend on how much of a rush a user is in when it comes to battery charging. The size of the battery, and the amount of use given to the car, among other things, must be taken into account too.

Electric vehicle charging stations

Let’s explore the different types of EVSE (electric vehicle supply equipment):

Level 1

  • This is the most common charger. It usually comes with every electric car purchased.
  • It connects to a standard 120 V outlet.
  • Furthermore, it provides approximately 5 miles (ca. 8 km) of range per hour of charging, which makes charging quite slow. It can take an average of 24 hours to fully charge an average EV battery.
  • These chargers are typically found in residential areas since they are mainly used for overnight recharging.
  • It’s a perfect choice for those who use their vehicle for short distances daily. It’s also ideal for those who don’t need to charge the battery fully every day.
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Level 2

  • These chargers are much faster than Level 1 ones. 
  • They can be found both in residential areas, and at public charging stations.
  • They recharge the battery of an EV, providing approximately 25 miles (ca. 40 km) of range per hour of charging. This may be more, depending on the type of car.
  • It can recharge a regular car battery in an average of eight hours. This makes it ideal to use while at the office, for example. 

Level 3

  • They are also known as DCFC, or DC fast chargers.
  • These are the fastest chargers on the market, and they use various types of connectors depending on the make and model of the car as well.
  • Likewise, Level 3 chargers aren’t used at the residential level because they are very expensive, require a lot of space and a super-reinforced connection and wiring.
  • DCFCs can provide up to 250 miles (ca. 402 km) of range per hour of charge, depending on the car. This means an average electric car battery can get to 100% in less than an hour.
  • They are ideal for long drives and are often seen on the side of highways, for example.

How to find an EVSE

If you’re driving through large corridors of states like California and Oregon, you may come across charging stations without even having to look for them.

If you’re traveling elsewhere, though, you may benefit from specific tools created to help you find the nearest charger.

At EVCS we thought of those drivers who need to plan where to stop to recharge their vehicle. That’s why we’ve created an interactive map embedded in our app and on our website, so you can search for charging points using only an address, city, or zip code.

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Using a map is the easiest way to find the nearest charger to your location.