Funeral & Sympathy Flowers: Do’s & Don’ts

Getting The Right Flowers For The Right Occasion

When it comes to situations where sympathetic condolences are being given, or you’re bringing floral arrangements to a funeral, it’s a good idea to bring the right sort of flowers. True, there are going to be those who bring some funky psychedelic bouquet, and you’ll notice how this is regarded by the bereaved.

No, especially for sad occasions, there are do’s and don’ts to consider. Here we’ll go over five tips to help you know what is worth keeping in mind, and what you should definitely avoid in such social situations.

1. Do: Bring Large Bouquets To Large Events

The level of ostentation behind which flowers you purchase can be variable. If you’re going to a more intimate event, try not to make it about you by purchasing so many massive bouquets that everyone must make a remark. You’re there to be sympathetic and respectful, not make the event about you. However, big bouquets are perfectly fine for big events.

2. Don’t: Bring Large Bouquets To Intimate Meetings

If the meeting is a one-on-one affair, a small bouquet of appropriate flowers makes sense. If the gathering is only a dozen or so, then a dozen or so flowers might be appropriate. You could go all out, but such moves tend to be less appropriate. Certainly, there are outliers. Some people lost someone who is quite outgoing; they might not mind such a move.

3. Do: Respect The Cultural Component

You want to be sure you purchase floral arrangements with sympathy flowers that match the cultural identities of those to whom you’re giving them. This writing is a bit too short to list all the proclivities of all the different cultures in the world. Just know that different colors mean different things to different people.

If you want to avoid further hurt, or at minimum your own embarrassment, then you want to be conscious of any cultural realities surrounding the bereaved. For the most part, differences from standard American fare will be minimal; but some individuals born and raised in the USA decided to pursue their cultural roots, so don’t make any blanket assumptions.

4. Don’t: Restrict Yourself Solely To Black And White Colors

There are roses that can be stained with the darkest obsidian hues imaginable. Likewise, there are white roses. Such hues tend to be common at events where there is mourning. But these aren’t the only colors that make an appearance. Lilies, carnations, chrysanthemums, traditional red roses, and orchids are also quite common.

Accordingly, it could be well worth your while to explore the advice of a local florist. They can tell you what is “in”, what is “out”, and which options are going to be the most “safe” given the event you plan to attend. The internet is also an invaluable resource for such information.

  1. Do: Explore Crosses, Hearts, And Wreaths Of Flowers
    There are plenty of situations where the best way to choose flower arrangements for the bereaved involves the sort of shape that said flowers have been configured to represent. Crosses and wreaths are quite popular, as are hearts. Again, be sure your level of ostentation doesn’t trump the tastes of those for whom you’re buying the flowers.

That said, such floral arrangements can communicate sympathy and sentimentality tied to beauty, and skill in craftsmanship. When those who are bereaved know you care, that does much to comfort what brokenness compels their emotions. So if it’s right to make a big showy gesture, then do it. If it’s wrong, then don’t. But themed arrangements can work either way.

Hitting All The Right “Notes”

Whether you’re purchasing flower arrangements in shapes like crosses, hearts, and wreaths, or you’re simply buying bouquets to display on or near the casket, you want to be sure you find flowers that fit the situation. Explore different arrangements, respect associated cultural components, and manage the size of flower arrangements to match the event.

Bereavement is painful, and the process of grieving can take a long time. Lastly, keep in mind that whatever you do, your best efforts likely won’t be enough to end the pain of those who are hurting. But you can help comfort them, and that’s the whole point.

 

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