Barbecue Sauce

Sauces were being put on food for a long time now. Sauces were a great way to aid the processes of preserving meat and leaving it to be smoked. The other way to preserve food was by leaving to soak in salty water. Salt is a great preservative. Some others use dry salt instead of soaking wet salty water to preserve food and meats. Apart from that, leaving meat in the hot sun or near a fire also helps dry out the meat, thus preserving it. Smoking, salting, and dehydrating food can help delay the spoilage of meats. Today, however, primarily, most people prefer to marinate the meat using sauces and leaving them to thaw away in the fridge till they are able to be used in cooking. 

Not only is using gluten free barbecue sauces or any other organic barbecue sauce considered a preserving technique, but it also improves the flavor of the meat while it’s being smoked, salted, seeds, and leaves. While basting the gluten free barbecue sauce marinated meat with vinegar, wine, or oil, it adds an extra flavor to the meat.

These preserved and dried out meats can bring vigor to meals when they are soaked in liquids to make a soup or stew base. This adds life to the meats and makes it softer to bite. 

What is a barbecue sauce?

Barbecue finds its origin in the Spanish word “Barbacoa” or “Barabicoa,” which comes from the Taino Native American tribe originating from the Caribbean and Florida areas. It is believed that colonials learned to make barbecues from these Native Americans and slaves from the Caribbean. 

In the olden times, barbecuing was meant to be included as part of the festive season that signified the gathering of a number of people in the community. Back then, barbecuing involved digging huge long and deep pits in the ground on top of which logs were added into the pits and burned to generate heat. This heat was used for cooking the marinated meats at a low-temperature and slow-roasted for hours on end, giving it a juicy, soft, and flavorful taste. Or the process involved, meats of different varieties suspended above these slow-roasting pits of coal fires, occasionally rotated to help evenly cook it. 

A Few Facts About Barbecue Trends Set in the World

The standard gluten free bbq sauce has evolved over time and cultures, incorporating many various flavor profiles and trends in a changing world. There are bold flavors from ethnic groups, subtle home-style flavors, and exotic flavors specific to just some ethnicity. 

  • In the year 2002, various organic barbecue sauce flavors spread across a variety of menu types and began to be used alongside french fries as well as wraps, pizzas used it, and many Asian food items such as seafood were best eaten dipped in barbecue sauce. They went on to be used in chicken wings and even in sandwich spreads. 
  • Furthermore, the sales of barbecue ribs spiked 7 percent higher in 2001 in comparison to 2000.
  • Likewise, the sales of barbecued chicken increased by 10 percent. 
  • In fact, even today, if you take a look at a modern contemporary menu in any mid-level restaurant, it will consist of barbecue sauce using recipes for about 10 percent of the menu in the appetizer section. 
  • Organic barbecue sauce is considered the second fastest growing flavored sauce according to a survey conducted by a chain account menu survey in 2001.

Why use Gluten-Free Barbecue Sauce?

Today so many of us in the world are allergic to celiac and gluten or possess some of the other kinds of allergies when it comes to food. Using gluten-free barbecue sauce can be really helpful as it contains less than 20 parts ppm of gluten and thus is safe for those with these digestional sensitivities. In fact, using these special barbecue sauces can work wonders for those following paleo and keto diets. 

Try out plenty of recipes that can be made using these gluten-free barbecue sauce recipes, and they work well with every ethnicity. They can be incorporated easily into Asian cooking as well as Haitian and American. So, give it a try today!